Lexcel

Category Archives: Residential Property

Continuing Best Practice following a successful Lexcel Assessment

North Ainley Solicitors has once again successfully secured the Law Society Legal Practice Quality Mark, Lexcel.Lexcel

Lexcel is an optional, recognised accreditation scheme for Law Firms and in house Legal Departments which gives the public the assurance that a Practice meets high Client Care and Business Management standards.  North Ainley originally achieved the standard in 2011 and has successfully retained the accreditation at each annual assessment thereafter.

John Ainley the senior partner of the firm said “we are delighted to have retained the Lexcel Accreditation.  There have been a number of changes to the standards in the last year, particularly in light of the recent GDPR requirements.  It is reassuring to know that our procedures are up to the mark.  There is a lot of choice in the legal services market but being Lexcel Accredited demonstrates our commitment to Client Care and Best Practice.  The best interests of our clients and staff are at the heart of the way we work”.

Also posted in Business Employment, Commercial & Corporate, Commercial Litigation, Employment, Family, Legal Briefs, Litigation Disputes, North Ainley News, Private Client, Probate & Estate Adminstration, Property Development | Comments closed

Tenant Fees Act 2019

On 1 June 2019, the Tenant Fees Act (“the Act”) will come into force.  The aim of the Act is to reduce costs Landlords may currently impose on tenants both at the outset and during the tenancy.  The Act applies to new tenancies from 1st June and to existing tenancies from 1 June 2020.  It affects tenants renting privately, student accommodation and licences. Letting Agents are also governed by the Act.  The Act does not apply to social housing and long leases.

Judgement

Of course, rent can still be claimed.  Rent payments cannot be increased at the beginning of the tenancy and then reduced later on in an effort to recoup costs indirectly.

A Landlord is permitted to claim certain payments by the Act, but the amount that can be claimed is restricted.  Whilst a deposit can still be claimed, the Act provides that the amount of the deposit cannot be more than five weeks rent if the annual rent of a property is less than £50,000.  If the annual rent is more than £50,000, the deposit must not exceed six weeks rent.  If a holding deposit is paid for a property, this must not be more than one weeks’ rent and once a tenancy agreement is entered into the holding deposit should be repaid.

Other charges can be made by a Landlord e.g. cost of replacing lost keys, charge for late payment of rent, ending the tenancy agreement early, changing the tenancy agreement or a claim for utility or Council Tax payments if not paid by the Tenant.  However, the Landlord can only recover the reasonable cost incurred by the Landlord.

Tenants will be entitled to recover charges wrongly paid.

A landlord in breach of Section 1 or 2 of the Act can face a fine of up to £5,000 for a first offence.  If a Landlord commits a further breach within five years of the first breach, a criminal offence is committed or alternatively the Landlord may face civil proceedings and be fined up to £30,000.

Landlords should note that if a payment prohibited by the Act has been taken and not re-paid to the Tenant, the Landlord will be prevented from serving a Section 21 notice.

For further information and guidance, contact our Dispute Resolution Team.

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The Housing Market

Despite the cold start to the year or the Brexit jitters, it’s not all doom and gloom as some sources reveal a positive start to the year.  House prices in the United Kingdom overall continued to rise in 2018 and it is predicted that this trend will continue in 2019:-

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  • Hometrack Property Analysts predict 3% rise
  • Halifax predict 2-4% rise
  • Rightmove have predicted no change
  • Nationwide have predicted 1% rise.

The above predictions cover the whole of the United Kingdom, however, the North West appears to be faring far better than London, South East, South West and East Midlands according to the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors.

Whilst the Bank of England believe the impact of the UK leaving the European Union could be significant on the housing market, that impact has not yet been felt in Oldham and the surrounding areas.  Whichever way Brexit is finally decided, the United Kingdom is still a stable country (contrary to current appearances) compared to many others and an end to the current uncertainty will make a positive difference.

Mortgage rates are very low, first time buyers are the most active group in the UK property market according to Hometrack Property Analysts and it may be that part of the reason the North West is currently doing so well is because of some companies relocating from London to Manchester and the surrounding areas and there are new high tech firms which are booming in the North West and creating more employment.  These initiatives attract buyers that are looking to live somewhere affordable and commutable.

Savilles Estate Agents have predicted that over the next 5 years property prices in the North West will rise by 21.6%  which is a very promising prediction and hopefully comes to fruition.

For further information or advice on buying a home, please contact a member of our conveyancing solicitors.

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Choosing the right lawyer

It can be a big decision to instruct a solicitor and it could end up costing you a lot of money, so you need to get it right!

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Certainly, it can be tempting to go to the first firm you think of, drive past on the way to work or that has the fanciest offices but there are some things you should consider before parting with your hard earned cash:

Specialism – Often, high street practices try to be a jack of all trades, with the same Solicitor offering advice on all manner of problems. But, if you have an employment law issue why would you want advice from a Solicitor with a background in property law? Do your research and make sure the Solicitor you will see is a specialist in and has good experience in the area you need advice on.

Recommendations – from people you know and trust are always useful but if your friend recommends a firm because they did a good job of selling their business, it does not make them best placed to help you make a personal injury claim.

Attitude – Make sure you are on the same page. If you want to resolve your issue amicably, you do not want an aggressive lawyer who will rack up costs arguing over nothing. Likewise, if you want a robust approach, don’t instruct a wallflower. A good lawyer will explain the options and alter their approach based on your instructions and will be mindful of how their approach will affect your costs; even if that means telling you what you don’t want to hear.

Alternatives – Does the firm promote and actively engage in other ways of resolving legal problems; such as ACAS Conciliation for employment problems or Mediation or Collaborative Law for family matters? Again, a good lawyer who isn’t just interested in taking your money will encourage these approaches where appropriate.

Likeability – Believe it or not, not all solicitors are cut throat so it’s important that you feel comfortable speaking with your legal adviser and that you feel able to build a relationship of trust and confidence. That said, just because you might want to go for a pint with them does not mean they will give you quality legal advice.

Fees – Make sure you have a very good estimate of what it’s likely to cost and when you will be billed. From 6 December 2018, all Solicitors websites must display prices and service information for residential conveyancing, probate, unfair & wrongful dismissals, debt recovery and licensing applications.

Choice – Remember you don’t have to use any firm which may already have been ‘assigned’ to you – perhaps by your employer when handling a settlement agreement or your car hire company when dealing with an Road Traffic Accident.

At North Ainley, we have been advising the people of Oldham since 1901 but that doesn’t mean you will get out of date advice, just lots of experience! Our size allows us to combine a friendly, personal service with city professionalism from a team of specialist Solicitors and legal advisers.

For more information, please call Laura Campbell, a Solicitor in our Dispute Resolution team on 0161 624 5614.

Also posted in Commercial & Corporate, Commercial Litigation, Employment, Family, Litigation Disputes, Private Client, Probate & Estate Adminstration | Comments closed

New Year, New Start

ChangeAre you buying a new house, starting a new business venture, getting married or expecting a new arrival this year?  However your life changes in 2019, make sure you keep your Will up to date to protect the ones you love.

Contact a member our legal team who can provide you advice and guidance on Wills, house sales or purchases, business advice and all family related matters.

Also posted in Commercial & Corporate, Family, North Ainley News, Private Client | Comments closed

Is your property energy efficient?

For most residential lettings, a Landlord has to have an Energy Performance Certificate (“EPC”) before they let a property.  As part of the government’s strive for energy efficiency, with effect from 1 April 2018, a Landlord should not grant a new tenancy/lease if the property has an EPC rating below E.  This is according to Part Three of The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property) (England and Wales) Regulations 2015, known as the MEES Regulations.

From 1 April 2020, the MEES Regulations apply to existing tenancies of domestic properties (usually granted prior to 1 April 2018) and from 1 April 2023 to commercial properties.

This article gives an overview of the Regulations and will focus on domestic private rented properties.  Broadly, this term covers ordinary lettings of properties by a private landlord.

What to do if your property has an EPC rating of less than E?   energy-efficiency-154006_960_720

  • A Landlord should check the MEES Regulations apply to the property and the type of tenancy.
  • A Landlord should carry out “relevant energy efficiency improvements” (for the meaning of which see below) to bring the EPC rating above the minimum threshold, unless an exemption to the MEES Regulations (as set out in the PRS Exemptions Register) applies.

The exemptions are:-

  • No funding exemption – If the costs of purchasing and installing the “relevant energy efficiency improvements” cannot be financed at no cost to the Landlord.
  • The consent exemption – A Tenant or other third party refuses to give consent to the relevant works being carried out to increase the energy efficiency or the Tenant refuses to give Consent to Green Deal funding.
  • The devaluation exemption – A Landlord has obtained a report from a Surveyor, which shows that the works to improve the energy efficiency would result in a reduction of more than five per cent in the value of the property.
  • Temporary exemption – In some situations, a Landlord (usually if the Landlord has recently acquired the property) may be given six months to comply with the prohibition on letting and carry out the relevant energy efficiency improvements.
  • Wall insulation exemption – If a Landlord has obtained written expert advice that cavity wall insulation, external wall insulation or internal wall insulation is not appropriate due to its negative impact on the structure of the property.
  • Although not classified as an exemption, if all relevant energy efficiency improvement works have been carried out but the property still has an EPC rating of lower than E, it may be let and the Landlord has up to five years to grant new lettings or continue existing lettings.

For all exemptions, the Landlord must register the property and his/her details on the PRS Exemptions Register.  The exemption is to be registered before it can be relied upon.

A relevant energy efficient improvement is a list of recommendations (often detailed on the EPC or a Surveyor’s report) and the impact they will have.  If such works are required, they must be one of the following:-

  • A measure to improve efficiency in the use of energy in the property and;
  • Identified as an improvement for the property in question.
  • Can also include installation of a service pipe for the supply of gas, if the property is not fuelled by mains gas and is situated 23 metres from the main of a gas transporter.

If a Landlord does not carry out the energy efficiency improvements and does not register the property on the PRS Exemptions Register, or puts false or mis-leading information on the PRS Exemptions register, a Landlord is likely to face enforcement action. This could mean a fine, depending on the type of breach up to £5,000 per breach for each property and/or publication of a notice detailing the non-compliant property, details of the breach of the MEES Regulations, the financial penalty (if any) and the Landlord’s details but not if the Landlord is an individual.

UPDATE

On 5 November 2018, following  a consultation, the Government confirmed that new Regulations will shortly be put before Parliament.  These will apply on the grant of a new tenancy to a new tenant or an existing tenant.  These Regulations will remove the “no cost to Landlord” principle and:-

  • Introduce a Landlord contribution towards any works required to improve energy efficiency capped at £3,500 including VAT.  Any energy efficiency measures undertaken since October 2017, will be included within the £3,500 cap, as will any available third party funding
  • There will be a new “high cost” exemption if the EPC grading of E of a property cannot be achieved for £3,500 or less.  Landlords will have to obtain three quotes, to enable registration of this exemption on the PRS Register
  • The “consent exemption” referred to above will be removed where a tenant has withheld consent to a Green Deal finance plan.

For advice and guidance on these issues or other Landlord/Tenant issues contact our litigation team.

Also posted in Commercial Litigation, Property Development | Comments closed

Important tips for Landlord’s on granting or ending an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (‘AST’)

Since 1 October 2015, under the Deregulation Act 2015, a Landlord offering a new Assured Shorthold Tenancy agreement to a tenant must ensure that the tenant is provided with :-

  • A Gas Safety Certificate for the property to be occupied
  • An Energy Performance Certificate
  • The booklet entitled – How to rent: the checklist for renting in England

With effect from 1 October 2018, the above requirements will apply to all tenancies, even those in existence prior to 1 October 2015.

It has also been the case for some time that if a deposit is paid by the Tenant, the Landlord must ensure that:-

  • The deposit is being held in accordance with an authorised Tenancy Deposit Scheme and;
  • the Tenant has received the information about the Tenancy Deposit Scheme within 30 days of the Deposit being received.  Failure to provide such information means that the Tenant has a claim against the Landlord of up to three times the amount of the Deposit.

It is important that a Landlord complies with the above points as this could impede a Landlord’s right to obtain possession of their property at the end of the term of the tenancy.  It is common for Landlords to serve a Section 21 Notice upon the Tenant, if the Tenant does not vacate at the end of the term.  Non-compliance with the requirements set out above will mean a Landlord cannot serve a Section 21 notice, although steps may be taken to rectify the situation and enable service of a Notice.  Alternatively, a Landlord may be able to serve a Section 8 Notice.

A Landlord is further prevented from serving a Section 21 notice:-

  • Within the first four months of the tenancy and must issue any possession proceedings within six months of the date of the Section 21 Notice.
  • If a local housing authority has served notice upon the Landlord about the condition of the property.

With effect from 1 October 2015  for any tenancies granted after that date (and 1 October 2018 for any other tenancies) Landlords must serve upon the Tenants the prescribed form of the Section 21 notice, otherwise, the Section 21 notice will be deemed ineffective.

For further information on granting a new tenancy please contact our Commercial Property team or for advice on serving a Notice to end a tenancy, please contact a member of our Dispute Resolution team.  Both departments can work together to provide overall comprehensive advice to suit your individual or business needs.

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Is your home owned by your partner?

In the 21st century it is very commonplace for individuals to cohabit with their partner. In the early stages of a relationship, a breakup seems remote.  If the property is owned in your partner’s sole name, it is prudent to consider at an early stage if you would be entitled to an interest in the home you share with your partner.  Many people invest their time and hard work into the “family home”, without establishing their rights.   This is a tricky area of law and it is important to obtain clear legal advice at the outset.

Judgement

The recent case of Dobson v Griffey [2018] EWHC 1117(Ch), emphasised  how difficult it can be to claim an interest in a property, if the property is in your partner’s sole name.  In this case, Ms Dobson and Mr Griffey were in a relationship and agreed to purchase a farm property in 2007, in Mr Griffey’s name, in which they would both live.  Ms Dobson alleged that before the property was purchased, an agreement was reached that she would have rights in the farm or that she had the right to live at the farm for her rest of her life. She also alleged agreement was reached that if Mr Griffey should die, she would inherit the property.

Ms Dobson carried out extensive manual work at the farm, including painting, tiling, clearing gutters and drains, creating gardens and re-sealing the roof. When the relationship broke down, she asserted that this manual work, together with the agreement she reached  with Mr Griffey before the farm was purchased meant she was entitled to a share in the proceeds of sale, when the farm was sold.  Mr Griffey did not agree and Court proceedings were issued by Ms Dobson, to establish her rights.

When couples are unmarried, the rules applied in the Family Court are not applicable and instead Courts have to decide cases such as this based on property law, which many consider are inadequate to deal with the way people live in the 21st century and reflect “contributions” made by an individual such as Ms Dobson.

The Judge hearing the case decided that no agreement was reached on the terms alleged by Ms Dobson and that she was not entitled to any money when the farm was sold. Accordingly, her claim failed.  She had not established any interest in the farm.

For help and expert guidance on these issues either at the outset or breakdown of a relationship contact the Dispute Resolution and Family team at North Ainley for further advice.

Also posted in Family, Legal Briefs | Comments closed

When is your home not your home?

What happens if you have lived with a partner for many years and your partner dies without making a Will?  What if the Will that your partner did make leaves little or nothing to you? In those circumstances, what rights do you have?

What, for example, happens to the property you shared with your partner?

What if your partner did not make a Will?

The Intestacy Rules will apply.  Co-habitees are not recognised under the Intestacy Rules.  A co-habitee would not benefit from a deceased partner’s estate.

What if the property is jointly owned?

If you owned the property with your partner on what is known as a joint tenant basis, the property would pass to you under established legal principles, whether or not your partner had a Will.

What if your partner owned the property?

If the property was in your partner’s sole name the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependants) Act 1975 allows certain categories of individuals (including those who have lived with a partner for more than two years) to make a claim against their partner’s estate, for what is known as reasonable financial provision.  The claim would be for such financial provision as it would be reasonable to receive for your maintenance.  Maintenance would include somewhere to live and may include a lump sum payment, dependent on your financial position.

“It won’t happen to me” In a recent case Thompson v Raggett (2018), a couple lived together for 42 years but never married.  Throughout the relationship, Ms Thompson was financially dependent upon Mr Hodge.  After suffering a stroke in 2006, she became physically dependent upon Mr Hodge and moved temporarily to a nursing home in 2015.  Mr Hodge purchased a cottage to be  adapted to Ms Thompson’s needs but he passed away before they could move into the cottage.  Mr Hodge made a will, leaving his £1.5m estate (including the cottage) to two tenants of a property he owned.  The will left nothing to Ms Thompson! She was effectively left homeless at the age of 79.

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Ms Thompson made a claim under the 1975 Act.  Often in these types of cases, Courts allow a cohabitee to live in a property during their lifetime and the property reverts on their death to the estate of the deceased partner.  Ms Thompson’s claim was successful and given the length of the relationship, she was awarded the cottage outright, c.£29,000 to cover costs of adapting the cottage to her needs and a lump sum payment of £160,000.

Don’t leave it to chance.  If any of these issues do or may affect you in the future, contact North Ainley for expert legal advice.

Johanna Nolan is a Solicitor in the Dispute Resolution team at North Ainley.  For advice on this issue or any dispute contact Johanna a member of our litigation team.

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Warning to all Landlords – time is running out!

Landlords will not be able to rent out both domestic and non-domestic properties unless they meet the new Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Rules (2018) which come into force on 1 April 2018.  Properties across England and Wales are currently expected not to pass the new rules and could face huge fines.

To make sure you don’t fall foul, consider the new rules and what you need to do to make your property compliant in time.

What are the upcoming EPC changes?

Landlords are required to have a EPC Certificate and they last for a period of ten years.  Back in 2015 legislation was passed that means, from 1 April 2018, properties will have to meet a minimum energy efficiency standard (MEES).  The minimum efficiency standard is set at an E rating for all types of domestic and non-domestic property.

So which properties do the new EPC rules apply to?

The new rules apply to both domestic and none-domestic properties in the private rental sector meaning that whether a landlord is letting out a commercial property or a house to a tenant, it could be unlawful to do so should the building not meet these new minimum EPC requirements.

Without an EPC rated E or above it will not be possible to issue a new tenancy, or renew an existing tenancy, from 1st April 2018.  There are fines of up to £5,000 for landlords that are found in breach of the legislation.  The regulations will be enforced by Trading Standards Officers. Penalties will be based on the rateable value of the property.

Do the EPC changes affect current tenancies or just new lets?

The 2018 rules only apply to new tenancies, but in 2020, the same rules will apply to all tenancies.

In April 2020, the new MEES rules will apply to all existing lets.  At this point, you will need an EPC rating of an E or above to let your property at all.  Even if your tenancy is already underway and you have no plans to renew, after April 2020, you will need to have an EPC rating of E or above or you could face fines.

What should I do if my rental property has an EPC that is lower than an E rating?

If your last EPC rating was below an E, the first thing to do is consider when the EPC was last carried our and what improvements, if any, you have made to the property that may have improved the energy efficiency rating.  EPC calculations are changing all the time and it is possible that you will receive a different rating to the one you got several years ago.  Your EPC report will have a list of recommended measures for improving your property’s energy efficiency performance.  You will need to carry out enough of these measures to improve your score to above an E rating.  If the property’s new EPC rating is still below an E, then you will need to make efficiency improvements to boost your rating before you let it out or renew your contract.

Speak to your EPC assessor if you are unsure about how to proceed with improvements.  After the energy efficiency changes have been made to the property, you will then need to get another EPC to show the new energy rating.

We recommend you review your property portfolio now to consider what you may need to budget for in the future.

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New Stamp Duty Charges for First Time Buyers

Prior to the Budget first-time buyers paid Stamp Duty on purchases above £125,000.  In today’s Budget the Chancellor announced that Stamp Duty has been abolished immediately for first-time buyers buying a home of up to £300,000.

The change means that for properties costing up to £500,000, no Stamp Duty will be paid on the first £300,000.  Stamp duty will then be charged at a rate of 5% on the amount from £300,00 to £500,000.

The change will apply in England and Wales, and in Northern Ireland up until the end of March 2018.

The table below illustrates the changes.

SDLT Table

What is Stamp Duty?

Stamp Duty is a lump-sum tax that anyone buying a property or land costing more than a set amount has to pay. The amount of tax you will have to pay varies based on the property price.

Do I qualify as a first-time buyer? 

A first-time buyer is defined as someone who has never owned freehold or leasehold property before and who is purchasing their only or main residence.  This includes ownership of a property anywhere in the world.

So if you have sold up and rented for a while, you do not qualify.

You also won’t qualify for the relief if you’re buying to let – even if it’s your first purchase.  The property you’re buying needs to be used as your main residence.

In respect of a joint purchase, all purchasers would need to be first-time buyers to qualify for the relief.

Please contact our Property Department for further information.

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Higher Stamp Duty and Residential Properties

As you may be aware, anyone buying a second residential property in England, Wales and Northern Ireland will probably have to pay an enhanced stamp duty rate of 3% above the usual rates.

People may think this only applies if you already own a residential property and then either purchase a buy to let property or a second home.  However, there are different scenarios that fall into the higher rate category that you may not have been aware of.

For example:-

  • Married couples/civil partners who separate, sell the matrimonial home and then individually purchase separate homes would have to pay stamp duty at the higher rate on the second property to complete because they are still classed by the Inland Revenue as one ‘unit’ owning two properties until such time as they have either a Financial Consent Order sealed by the Court, or a formal Separation Deed.
  • If you buy a property with someone else and at the time of completion one of you then owns two or more properties, the second purchase is subject to the higher rate, even if the other purchaser does not own another property.
  • If you purchase a second residential property and rent out your first residential property, you will still have to pay the higher rate of stamp duty on your purchase.
  • Purchasing a property in the name of a company is also subject to the higher rates, even if the property will be the only residential property owned by the company, if any Director of the company owns another residential property.
  • A property owned outside England, Wales and Northern Ireland is still taken into account if you then buy a further residential property in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, even though the first residential property is in a different country.

There are many different scenarios that will mean higher rates apply if at the end of the day you own more than one residential property at the time of completion.  The following link will provide further information : https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/consultation-on-higher-rates-of-stamp-duty-land-tax-sdlt-on-purchases-of-additional-residential-properties/higher-rates-of-stamp-duty-land-tax-sdlt-on-purchases-of-additional-residential-properties

In certain circumstances higher stamp duty can be reclaimed (as in the difference between the lower rate and the extra 3% rate) if within a three year period of purchasing the additional property you sell your previous home then a request can be forwarded to the Inland Revenue to see if you are eligible for a refund.

 

If you are at all in doubt about whether the higher rates apply to your transaction, then you should check the Government website referred to above or seek tax advice from your Accountant or Financial Advisor.

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Potential new tax break for home owners

A new tax relief will be available from 6 April this year, for property owners who leave their property to their spouse or their children and grandchildren.

At present, each of us is able to leave £325,000 to anyone we choose, without creating any inheritance tax liability. If your personal estate is worth more than £325,000 any amount over this sum can be taxed at 40%. This means for every £1 you leave which exceeds £325,000, 40p will go straight to the Government. For this reason estate planning has always been a very important aspect of the work that we do for our clients at North Ainley.

From 6 April 2017, the Government has introduced a new tax relief known as the Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB) which will see homeowners who die after April 2017 leaving their property to their spouse or children, being able to claim up to an additional £100,000 of tax relief. This amount is set to increase by £25,000 each year until 2020 when the additional relief that homeowners can claim will be up to £175,000 per person.

It makes sense to keep your Will under regular review to take advantage of changing circumstances and this is an excellent time to make a Will if you do not already have one. This latest change in legislation offers a perfect opportunity to reconsider the planning of your estate and whether or not your current arrangements take maximum advantage of the tax reliefs available.

However, the rules are complicated and the availability of the additional relief depends on your individual circumstances. We are happy to discuss your current arrangements to see if changes could be made. That way, we can advise you on the best course of action to take advantage of all tax reliefs available to your estate on your death and ensure that you maximise your RNRB entitlement.

To arrange an appointment with a member of our Private Client Team please get in touch using our Contact Form.

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  • In This Section

  • Communication excellent. Very friendly staff. Joy to do business.
    Dr Ahmed - Oldham
  • Lisa Wright
    Lisa Wright
    15:05 25 Feb 19
    Cassie was fantastic throughout our sale and would recommend North Ainley if selling or buying a house.read more
    Lynn Findlater
    Lynn Findlater
    18:55 01 Dec 18
    I have used North Ainley for a number of years. They have successfully dealt with my parent's wills and more recently the sale of 2 properties. The staff are exceptional and imparticular Cassie who took care of the whole process from start to finish whilst I was overseas. She diligently chased all third parties and kept me informed at all times. I would recommend North Ainley as they have proved themselves time and again over the last 10 years in all of my family's legal affairs.read more
    Idnan Ahmed
    Idnan Ahmed
    12:57 30 Nov 18
    Excellent service. handled my latest commercial purchase professionally. Would recommend to anyone who is looking for a solicitors who are proffesional and easy to work with. Top service.read more
    Lucy Hoy
    Lucy Hoy
    16:39 27 Nov 18
    Excellent! Very friendly and fantastic communication throughout. Nothing was to much trouble. Thankyou Vinesh and Cassie. Would definitely recommend.read more
    Anil M
    Anil M
    15:11 04 Nov 18
    Fantastic Solicitors firm. Very professional. Close to Oldham Town Centre. Answer all your questions and concerns. Keep you upto date at every stage. I have used this firm for many years in buying and selling property. You can not go wrong using North Ainley Solicitors.read more
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